Join Tom for a CE event on April 24!

On April 24, Financial Planning Advocate, LLC will be hosting a CE event with Tom Tillery as the presenter and will address the subject of Personal Financial Planning & Community Property.

Marital property law affects all aspects of the personal financial planning process including: business interests, debt, estate, risk management and tax.
Your clients do not have to reside in a community property state in order for the community property rules to apply to their personal financial planning. The presentation will illustrate the application of community property law to the personal financial planning process, survey the history of Common and Community Property law, review the types of marital property ownership systems, and discuss the concept of ‘once community property always community property’ – regardless of jurisdiction.

The Webcast will be held on Friday, April 24, 2015 at 1:30PM EDT. The course is approved for one hour of CPE and CE. To register for the class, please email us at hello@ttillery.com. Virtual Seating is limited.

Join Tom for a CE event on January 30!

On January 30, Financial Planning Advocate, LLC will be hosting a CE event with Tom Tillery as the presenter and will address the subject of Case Studies in the Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax in the Personal Financial Planning Process.

The various types of Generation-Skipping Transfers will be illustrated through case studies in the personal financial planning process. The presentation will review the history of the Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax; illustrate the various types of “skips” through case studies; as well as, assess how these “skips” impact the personal financial planning process.

The Webcast will be held on Friday, January 30, 2015 at 1:30 PM EST. The course is approved for one hour of CPE and CE. To register for the class, please email us at hello@ttillery.com. Virtual Seating is limited.

Join Tom for a CE event on December 5!

On December 5, Financial Planning Advocate, LLC will be hosting a CE event with Tom Tillery as the presenter and will address the subject of Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax in the Personal Financial Planning Process.

Topics to be addressed will be: This presentation will review the history of the Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, as well as detail how the various changes within its structure affect the personal financial planning process. Topics will include the various types of ‘skips,’ the implications of EGTRRA and ‘indirect skips,’ as well as a review of the various strategies in ‘preserving portability.’ The Webcast will be held on Friday, December 5, 2014 at 1:30 PM EST. The course is approved for one hour of CPE and CE. To register for the class, please email us at hello@ttillery.com. Virtual Seating is limited.

The Buck Stops Here!

The Recession of 2007 – 2009 generated a great deal of blame and finger pointing. In my mind I visualize the recession as a “multi-car accident” with everyone fleeing the scene and pointing their fingers at the “other guy” as the responsible party. No one hung around to be accountable.

Actually in U.S. history, no one is more accountable than President Harry S. Truman, the haberdasher from Independence, Missouri. He inherited the “multi-car accident,” World War II, the Cold War, and global inflation. But on his desk was a reminder of a strong truth: “The Buck Stops Here.” Many do not know that prisoners in the Federal Reformatory at El Reno, Oklahoma, made this sign. On the reverse side of the sign are the words “I’m From Missouri.” [Read more…]

Unbridled Optimism!

I must confess I am an unbridled optimist. I have always been the glass runneth over type, as opposed to a half full or half empty—kind of person. At social events, I will not shy away from the “doom and gloomers.” I usually confront them with a positive comment. The conversation goes something like this: “I can’t wait till so and so is out of office because they are ruining the country.”

My response is, “the only way to ruin a country is for its citizens to abandon it.” William James said, “Pessimism leads to weakness, optimism to power.” Dietrich Bonhoeffer felt that “The essence of optimism is that it takes no account of the present, but it is a source of inspiration, of vitality and hope where others have resigned; it enables a man to hold his head high, to claim the future for himself and not to abandon it to his enemy.”

Here is more good news to confront the “naysayers.” The IRS has just released the “Fall 2013 Statistics of Income Bulletin.” And the news is good—go figure. For tax year 2011, taxpayers filed 145.4 million individual income tax returns. This is an increase of 1.7 percent from tax year 2010. Even better, the adjusted gross income reported on these returns is up 3.5 percent from the previous year. And the icing on the cake is taxable income for 2011 rose 4.4 percent. And knowing the taxpayers predilection for understating income and overstating expenses, I would say the news is even better.

So, has the U.S. government rescued it citizens? I would say, “No.” It’s the citizens of the United States that not only rescued themselves but saved the planet during 2007 – 2009. More particularly, it was the U.S. small business owner, who regardless of economic circumstance—famine, war, or recession—is able to make a living for themselves and their families.

If you are looking for optimism to begin the New Year, then look no further than your neighbor and all those who embrace the “can do” attitude of America. And the next time bad news is heralded at an event, share some good news. Automobile sales are up. Housing sales are up. We have a surplus of oil and we are about to export natural gas. Just being an American is cause for optimism.

Think Before You Take That First Step!

I recently received the following question from an attorney and wanted to share it with you because it could help you as you work with and support your clients and friends who have the same situation. “‘My father asked me, ‘Now that I have turned 65, I plan to draw on your mother’s Social Security benefit and continue working. How do I go about doing this?’ My parents are both 65, are highly compensated ($300,000 plus), and plan to continue working into the foreseeable future. Is this a good idea?”

After I fell out of my chair, I asked the attorney where his father got this idea. He said an insurance agent trying to sell him Medicare Advantage suggested this as being a good strategy. Good is a very subjective word. Also, not knowing all of the facts and circumstances is problematic. However, more likely than not, this is not a good idea. Claiming a Social Security retirement benefit sooner than it is needed can be a costly mistake. The mistakes in this scenario are found by looking at the Social Security rules, the income tax rules; as well as, general principles for retirement planning. [Read more…]

The Gift That Keeps on Giving

Without fail, every December for the past 27 years, I have received requests at the last minute for a tax deduction to help offset income for the current year.  I follow up the request with two questions: how much would you like to contribute and to what would you like to make the contribution?  My questions are usually followed by a deafening silence and a true deer in the headlight look.

Charitable gifts are best not rushed, and I encourage clients to direct their charitable giving to causes in which they understand and have an interest.  Last minute charitable gifts and tax deductions often conflict with deliberate and purposeful giving.  Is there a solution?  Indeed there is a solution; the answer is a Donor-Advised Fund. [Read more…]

Tis the Season . . .

December 31, 2013 is fast approaching and the deadline for making charitable gifts and receiving an income tax deduction is fast upon us. I often wonder who is giving and how much is being given. One source for such statistics is the National Philanthropic Trust.

Some of the numbers are encouraging, especially in light of the Recession of 2007 – 2009. The percentage of U.S. households which give to charity is 88%.  Charitable giving is up 3.9% which exceeds the consumer price index. Of total giving, the largest source is from individuals (73%), followed by foundations (14%), bequests (8%), and corporations (5%) [Yes, there are rounding errors—not my issue]. [Read more…]

It’s Almost “That” Time!

Well, it’s that time of year, and everyone is preparing their list of tax deductions in hopes that the jolly Internal Revenue Service will provide them with tax breaks. Between now and year-end I will be addressing year-end tax planning, and hopefully, filling everyone’s stockings with deductions.

A perennial question is the deductibility of legal fees. I have received a request from an attorney, whose primary practice is the sale of businesses.  He wrote:

“We have a client who has asked whether our legal expenses for Trust and Estate planning could be run through his company (he is the sole owner). I am curious as to the accounting basis for doing this deduction. I will obviously have the client double check any course of action with his CPA, but I’m curious as to your thoughts on this matter. Any help or advice you can offer would be very much appreciated.” [Read more…]

Don’t Let the Bogeyman Get You!

An adviser forwarded the following email string along to me—you can’t make this stuff up!  Only in America. . . .

The adviser’s clients had landscaping work accomplished at their home. After the work was completed a final bill was sent by the landscaping firm.  At the bottom of the invoice was the following handwritten note:

“P.S.  I know I quoted you $635.00 for the project. However, being a business owner I don’t mind asking if you can pay in cash, or write a check out to me in my name. If you do so, I will reduce the price for my services to $600.00.  My taxes are horrible.  If you don’t want to, I will not be upset at all and will understand 100%.  Please let me know.  I can stop by and pick up the check at your convenience.”

[Read more…]